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Homes    


Performance    


Learning    

No. 7 Trinity Square, a grade II listed house in Margate is likely to date from the 1830s; the earliest evidence of a plot being defined is shown on the 1821 historic map. The 1852 map shows a single-room-depth house with a lean-to extension on the back. In around 1910 the house doubled in size with a full stack of back rooms, a new staircase and a new roof.


In the 1970s, the house was divided into two flats, when new partition walls and kitchens were added.  Since being divided, with an absentee owner, the building deteriorated and required substantial repairs.


Our conservation works reunited the house with an owner-occupier, removed all post-1910 works and made discreet new interventions to suit a contemporary single family home. Our main alteration was to open up the ground floor walls internally and to the 1910 back wall to better connect the living areas with the sunny back yard.


The completed house is a collage of good quality and characterful interventions from the past 200 years, with each material repaired, gently treated to work as a whole, and made to last another generation. 

1830s / 1910s HOUSE

Trinity Square, Margate

2018-2021


Society    

Below left: Photo-collage showing the proposed opening up of the rear annex and access to back yard, bringing afternoon sun deeper into the ground and lower ground floors.

Below: Early Concept Sketches:

Above: 1930s aerial photo with 7 Trinity Sq. highlighted in yellow.

Left: Conserved front facade


Below: Lime plastered and painted back bedroom, with paint-stripped iron fireplace.

Below: Lime plastered and painted top bedroom walls and ceiling; historic cabinet decorated, with 1960s handle left intact. All floorboards were lifted, joists strengthened, re-laid, lightly sanded and oiled. 

Above: Cellar wetroom shower and boiler cabinet (left); New basin and tap (centre); and WC niche (right).

Above left: Conserved cellar front room, now a bedroom with new shutters for privacy and cast iron radiator tucked underneath for warmth.

Above: New lime pointing to front brickwork with fine-gauged white 'tuck', gently blends in with remaining historic fragments and stubborn 1970s cement.

Below: Previous back door, which now has been removed, along with the adjacent brick wall.


Right: Completed back door with new metal framed-double-glazing, and steel column to support removed brickwork.



Above: 'As Existing' house before conservation works commenced.

Below: The one-room deep house in 1852