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We have just completed the conservation of this 1830s building to become the new studio for our practice.  There is evidence in the way its constructed to suggest that the building was originally constructed as two separate mews cottages, serving the main house at 13 Hawley Square, but over time had been connected together into one 3-house premises, likely in the late C19th when the house/s were used simultaneously as a feather and fur factory, and a boarding house. 


Our proposal sought to repair much of the existing historic fabric and restore the lost spatial connections through the building whilst making sensitive architectural interventions in order to create a good quality, creative commercial studio space.  Construction work was by local firm MAM Builders.

1830 LION HOUSE

Princes Street, Margate

2017+


Society    

Use of wet hessian to prevent new lime mortar from drying to quickly in the summer

Exposing and repairing original plaster laths

Capt. Sadlere, Margate Lion Tamer, was a former inhabitant of 13 Princes Street, now the office and workshop of Studio Sam Causer. We wonder if the deep scratches to the base of the studio door derive from Sadlere's lion cubs...

New retaining wall being set out for the studio's workshop entrance.

Acroprops and strongboys in the conservation of one of six exposed fireplaces

Extraordinary effect created by sanding off the modern internal gloss paint from the lime-plastered walls, leaving a camouflage-pattern showing each of the historic layers of paint, including greens, blues, peaches,and magnolia.  The surface is now sealed with Marseille soap which soaks in creating a breathable, invisible seal.

Lion House published in Architecture Today April 2018 issue with article by our Associate Director Fiona Raley, Chair of the RIBA Conservation Group on contemporary conservation principles

Washing and sealing the walls with Marseille Soap.